Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Lesson 363 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off contrasted expressions. Example: His mother, not his father, is in charge.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Your car not your truck is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt not my uncle used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table not the one near the window.

4. Our track team not our baseball team won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner not the manager about the job.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Your car, not your truck, is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt, not my uncle, used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table, not the one near the window.

4. Our track team, not our baseball team, won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner, not the manager, about the job.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Lesson 362 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma when words are omitted from parallel clauses in a compound sentence. Example: Mother baked an apple pie, and Aunt Gayle, a chocolate cake.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina a scary one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah, the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife, country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd, Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box, the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina, a scary one.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, February 5, 2018

Lesson 361 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to set off a short clause at the end of the sentence to change a statement into a question or an exclamatory sentence. Example: You are going to town, aren't you?

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. That should make them take notice shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries doesn't he!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That should make them take notice, shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location, isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle, isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning, wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries, doesn't he!

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 356 - 360 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Comma

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. When you return the opportunity will still await you.

2. Having done my best I sat down to see the results.

3. To get the job done you will need to pace yourself.

4. During the last game of the World Series a riot took place.

5. His face stern and set told me that I was in trouble.

6. The answer without doubt will make all the difference.

7. After you finish doing the dishes the floor needs mopping.

8. To get the correct results you must follow the proper order of adding ingredients.

9. Trying to secure the boat the man fell haplessly into the water.

10. In view of the recent events in the Middle East peace does not seem likely.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When you return, the opportunity will still await you.

2. Having done my best, I sat down to see the results.

3. To get the job done, you will need to pace yourself.

4. During the last game of the World Series, a riot took place.

5. His face, stern and set, told me that I was in trouble.

6. The answer, without doubt, will make all the difference.

7. After you finish doing the dishes, the floor needs mopping.

8. To get the correct results, you must follow the proper order of adding ingredients.

9. Trying to secure the boat, the man fell haplessly into the water.

10. In view of the recent events in the Middle East, peace does not seem likely.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Lesson 360 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off transposed (out of their natural order) words, phrases, or other modifiers.

Example: This woman, without question, is too weak. These transposed items are very much like the introductory items, but they do not come at the beginning of the sentence.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Turn to increase the volume the knob to the right.

2. Very quietly the intruder closed the door.

3. Her hand cut and bruised showed the ordeal undertaken by her.

4. Sam although he likes drama seldom ever attends a play.

5. All the contestants eager and well-prepared required a good night's rest.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Turn, to increase the volume, the knob to the right.

2. Very quietly, the intruder closed the door.

3. Her hand, cut and bruised, showed the ordeal undertaken by her.

4. Sam, although he likes drama, seldom ever attends a play.

5. All the contestants, eager and well-prepared, required a good night's rest.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Lesson 359 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after long introductory prepositional phrases or two or more consecutive prepositional phrases. Examples: At the entrance to the cave, the guide gave us instructions. During those hot, boring summer days, time passed very slowly.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. After the wreck into the pine tree the car was towed away.

2. Into the woods during the shower ran the black horse.

3. After the long and exhausting trip we finally arrived at our destination.

4. In the hall closet on the top shelf you will find the material I need.

5. Through the vast expanse of space the astronauts traveled continuously.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. After the wreck into the pine tree, the car was towed away.

2. Into the woods during the shower, ran the black horse.

3. After the long and exhausting trip, we finally arrived at our destination.

4. In the hall closet on the top shelf, you will find the material I need.

5. Through the vast expanse of space, the astronauts traveled continuously.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Lesson 358 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after an introductory dependent adverb clause. Example: If you want to see the Olympics, order your tickets now.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. When my luggage arrives I will give you your present.

2. After the game was over both the team and the fans celebrated.

3. If you do not believe me ask the rest of those present.

4. Although I am afraid I will lead you through the woods.

5. Where the troops are we are going.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When my luggage arrives, I will give you your present.

2. After the game was over, both the team and the fans celebrated.

3. If you do not believe me, ask the rest of those present.

4. Although I am afraid, I will lead you through the woods.

5. Where the troops are, we are going.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Lesson 357 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after an introductory infinitive used as an adjective. Example: To find her ring, Mary removed everything from the room.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. To reach Butte, Montana, in time we will need to leave before 10:00 A.M.

2. To succeed at this task you will need to practice daily.

3. To be chosen for the finals the contestant will have to do better.

4. To truly believe the story one must find answers for one's self.

5. To get the best results you should soak it for an hour.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. To reach Butte, Montana, in time, we will need to leave before 10:00 A.M.

2. To succeed at this task, you will need to practice daily.

3. To be chosen for the finals, the contestant will have to do better.

4. To truly believe the story, one must find answers for one's self.

5. To get the best results, you should soak it for an hour.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Lesson 356 - Mechanics -Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after an introductory participial phrase. Example: Feeling hot, the boy ran to the refrigerator for a drink.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Needing help immediately I dialed 911.

2. Having seen the final act I started to cry.

3. Thinking back on her life the woman was very thankful.

4. Having done his very best the boy stood tall and happy.

5. Desiring to be accepted Larry did some unusual things.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Needing help immediately, I dialed 911.

2. Having seen the final act, I started to cry.

3. Thinking back on her life, the woman was very thankful.

4. Having done his very best, the boy stood tall and happy.

5. Desiring to be accepted, Larry did some unusual things.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 351 - 355 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Ila indeed is a good mother.

2. I hope Jennie that you don't go to jail.

3. My son-in-law Chris will be able to vote in the coming election.

4. Oh Gail I hope that you on the other hand will be happy with your decision your move to Europe.

5. We sat in the shade beneath a broad green tree Irene.

6. It was a lovely happy memorable time.

7. I know after all you will be successful.

8. Mr. Allen Rudy the boy next door has been fighting with your brother Richard.

9. Of course we could hear immediately that you after all will be going to Santos a great city in Brazil.

10. Well Will I hope to see you by the way in Manaus on our return from our vacation a trip to Australia.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Ila, indeed, is a good mother.

2. I hope, Jennie, that you don't go to jail.

3. My son-in-law Chris will be able to vote in the coming election. (a closely related appositive or use commas around Chris if you thought it was a noun of address) My son-in-law, Chris, will be able to vote in the coming election.

4. Oh, Gail, I hope that you, on the other hand, will be happy with your decision, your move to Europe.

5. We sat in the shade beneath a broad green tree, Irene.

6. It was a lovely, happy, memorable time.

7. I know, after all, you will be successful.

8. Mr. Allen, Rudy, the boy next door, has been fighting with your brother Richard. (Richard is a closely related appositive)

9. Of course, we could hear immediately that you, after all, will be going to Santos, a great city in Brazil.

10. Well, Will, I hope to see you, by the way, in Manaus on our return from our vacation, a trip to Australia.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Lesson 355 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off parenthetical expressions. Parenthetical expressions are words inserted in the main sentence but not necessary to the meaning. They interrupt the flow of the sentence. Common expressions used parenthetically are however, of course, on the other hand, in fact, for example, that is, by the way, after all, perhaps, indeed, also, too, nevertheless. These expressions are not always parenthetical. Examples: Lucy, on the other hand, reads little. He knows, perhaps, five answers to the questions.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The story that I just told you by the way is true.

2. My plan nevertheless was followed and succeeded.

3. Your plan on the other hand was rejected for good reasons.

4. I might suggest for example that you make some revisions.

5. You in fact should be moved to a different department.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:


1. The story that I just told you, by the way, is true.

2. My plan, nevertheless, was followed and succeeded.

3. Your plan, on the other hand, was rejected for good reasons.

4. I might suggest, for example, that you make some revisions.

5. You, in fact, should be moved to a different department.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Lesson 354 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to separate co-ordinate adjectives. Co-ordinate adjectives can be checked to see if a comma is necessary by placing and between them. They will sound smooth and correct with the and.

Examples: The warm, sunny day made everyone happy. (warm and sunny sounds smooth) You are a clever little girl. (clever and little doesn't sound smooth)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Today was not a clear sunny day.

2. Allison thought she was such a clever little girl.

3. Where did you buy that dashing red car?

4. They say that tomorrow will be a sunny warm day.

5. Your careless inconsiderate behavior could cause you serious problems.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Today was not a clear, sunny day.

2. no commas needed

3. no commas needed

4. They say that tomorrow will be a sunny, warm day.

5. Your careless, inconsiderate behavior could cause you serious problems.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Lesson 353 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off an appositive if not closely tied to the words it equals or identifies. Examples: Larry Millward, my best friend, will speak at the meeting. My brother Ken moved to Hawaii. (closely tied)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred James a soldier captured during World War II spoke at the assembly.

2. My sister Elaine died recently.

3. Paul the top student in his class was the valedictorian.

4. Small farming a very important occupation is disappearing.

5. We rode all day on Dot a very old and gentle horse.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Fred James, a soldier captured during World War II, spoke at the assembly.

2. My sister Elaine died recently. (It is closely tied, but one could take Elaine as a noun of address if you don't know her as the sister.)

3. Paul, the top student in his class, was the valedictorian.

4. Small farming, a very important occupation, is disappearing.

5. We rode all day on Dot, a very old and gentle horse.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Lesson 352 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off words or phrases used as nouns of address (nominatives of address).

Joe, get over here. Get over here, Joe. Young man, get over here.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Did you Susan see him at the meetings?

2. I will call you in the morning Steve.

3. Well Fred it was a pleasure to see you again.

4. Jeanne I don't know what is going on.

5. You should Bill know the answer to that one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Did you, Susan, see him at the meetings?

2. I will call you in the morning, Steve.

3. Well, Fred, it was a pleasure to see you again.

4. Jeanne, I don't know what is going on.

5. You should, Bill, know the answer to that one.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

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